February 2019 Full Moon

“Hunger Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

February’s full moon is tomorrow night! If you are looking for moonrise of the full moon, it will be at 5:19 pm Tuesday night (all times Midcoast Maine, Eastern time), which follows sunset at 5:11 pm. Moonset Tuesday morning at 6:42 am (near sunrise at 6:29 am) is a good photography opportunity, too.

February has some of my favorite names, too, like the Hunger Moon above. Other common names for February full moon are Bone Moon, Storm Moon, and Quiet Moon.

You can find my full moon project, Adventures in Celestial Mechanics, on my website. Enjoy!

“Bone Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Storm Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Quiet Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
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Artist Residencies for Photographers

“Acadia, Nocturne #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I’ve done four artist residencies over the past few years and I find them incredibly worthwhile. The idea behind them is simple — allowing artists the time and space to do their work away from the distractions of daily life. They vary immensely, of course… some are a week long, some are six months long; some are solitary and some encourage artist residents to interact and possibly collaborate with each other; some expect a piece of work to be donated at the end while others do not; and so on.

The most comprehensive place to find about art residencies is res artis — they provide a rolling list of upcoming deadlines of artist residencies worldwide. Another good list is from the Alliance of Artists Communities. In this post I’m going to focus just on artist residencies that are based in Maine and that are open to photographers.

The 2019 deadline has passed for two residency programs here in Maine, but the Tides Institute in Eastport and the Acadia National Park Artist-in-Residency program are both work checking out for future years.

The new Monson Arts center is now accepting applications for their residency program, with applications due February 15th. I saw an early version for their facilities and I think it is going to be a really nice space (and is an amazingly beautiful part of Maine).

The Maine Farmland Trust has their 2019 residencies at the Fiore Art Center open for submissions. They have quite a few disciplines for different types of artists, including visual artists, and submissions are due March 1st.

Hewnoaks is a wonderful residency on the shores of Kezar Lake in southwestern Maine – I was a resident there a few years ago. Applications open on February 2nd and will be due March 4th.

The Norton Island residency looks great and submissions are due March 15th.

The Monhegan Artists’ Residency program has been around for a while and I’ve had my eye on it for years, but I don’t think I can do the 5-week timeframe at this point in my life. It looks amazing, though, and submissions are due March 17th, 2019.

 

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Your Favorite Photographs of 2018

I gave you mine, and you have given me yours – below you’ll find favorite photographs from 2018 from friends of the blog. This is one of my favorite posts of the year as I love seeing the diverse and wonderful work that is out there. I also encourage you to check out the website associated with many of them if you like what you see here. And thank you to everyone for putting their work out there and sharing it with readers here.

Enough prelude — enjoy!

Copyright Ann Krumrein. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Susan Davens. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Terry Hire. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Susan Guthrie. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Linda Mahoney. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Jim Nyce. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Jeannie Hutchins. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Jeanne Goodman. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Ed McCranie. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Alex Grissom. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Mark Wlaz. All Rights Reserved.
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Photography in Maine February 2019

“Barrett’s Cove, Dusk”. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

This is the second in my new series of monthly posts that cover photography exhibits in the state of Maine. For Boston and some of greater New England, I recommend the What Will You Remember blog for exhibit lists and reviews (here’s the February post). If you have an exhibit you’d like me to publicize, please let me know as well. Onward to the list for February…

Portland Museum of Art, Portland. The big photography show is Richard Avedon: Portraits, 1952-1970, which is a must-see (that I haven’t yet seen!). You and I both have until June 16th to see it. The Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago exhibit also includes photography and extends until May 5th.

Bates College Museum of Art, Lewiston. Peter Turnley: Refugees through March 23rd, photojournalism of refugees throughout world. Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era, also through March 23rd, includes a variety of artwork (including work by a number of photographyers) focused on nature and the effect of mankind upon it in the 21st Century.

162 Russell, Rockport. I definitely recommend checking out the extended pop-up exhibition at 162 Russell Ave in Rockport (the old CMCA building. The exhibit takes advantage of the beautiful space with collected works from Paul Caponigro, Ni Rong, and Dirk McDonnell. The show extends until February 2nd (that is tomorrow!) and is open Fridays and Saturdays 1-5 pm. You can hear an interview with them about the show here.

Portland Media Center, Portland. “The Way Life Is — Maine Working Families and Communities” has moved to this new location at the Portland Media Center until February 22nd. There is an opening reception I think tonight (!) from 5-8 pm at the Union of Maine Visual Artists Gallery at Portland Media Center at 516 Congress St. There is a good article about the exhibition here. This should be a great show if you are in the area and can check it out.

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Calls for Entries February 2019

Winter Atlas #24. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

It is time for my monthly summary of upcoming calls for entries for photographers, particularly those in Maine and New England, so please find below my list for February 2019. This tends to be a slow time of year but there are still some good options out there.

This list is certainly not exhaustive and usually reflects ones of particular interest to me, but hopefully it will be helpful to many of you as well.

Good luck!

The BlackBox Gallery in Portland, OR has two upcoming calls… “Taking Pictures: 2019” due February 8th and “Vision: Shadow and Light” due March 8th.  This gallery offers free printing and framing of selected work, keeping costs reasonable if you are selected.

Lenscratch has their next free online exhibition running now, entitled “The Kiss” and with entries due February 8th.

The Fence has their annual calls open now, too, with early bird entries due February 11th and all entries due March 11th. This is the one that has the large outdoor exhibition of selected works in various cities.

The PhotoPlace Gallery in Vermont has a call for entry entitled “Altered Realities” due February 18th and another entitled “Trees: Life in the Slow Lane” due March 18th. They offer free framing in standard sizes, too, to help minimize costs if selected.

Center in Santa Fe has their annual suite of calls for entries up, with entries due February 20th. They have a series of grants and awards as well as their annual juried portfolio review, and all are recommended if they are a good fit for your work.

Lensculture, the online magazine, has their next call up for their 2019 Portraits exhibition with entries due February 20th. They do give you a free written review from one of the jurors as part of the submission, too.

NESOP in Waltham has a call for entry entitled “Stranger Than Fiction: Street Photography“, with entries due February 22nd.

Bostick & Sullivan is having their first ever call for entry, jurored by Alt Pro guru Christopher James, and with entries due February 28th.

The New York Center for Photographic Art has their next call up, Momentum. It is juried by Debra Klomp Ching and entries are due March 17th.

The Maine Arts Commission has is now accepting applications for artist Project Grants (due March 21st) and Maine Artist Fellowships (due June 20th).

The San Francisco Bay International Photography Exhibition (part of the SF Bay Month of Photography) is accepting entries for its annual exhibition, with entries due May 15th.

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Call for Your Favorites of 2018

Snæfellsjökull, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I just posted my own favorites of 2018, and now I’d like to publish yours! If you’d like to be included, send me a jpeg (and a link, if you so desire) to jim@jimnickelson.com. I’ll be making the post of all the submissions near the end of this month. I love seeing the wide variety of great work that people inevitably submit, so I hope you participate!

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Full Moon January 2019, with bonus eclipse!

“Blood Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

As you have likely heard, the full moon for January is going to be an exciting one! The full moon will occur Sunday night and here in North America we’ll see a total lunar eclipse (as depicted in my photograph from a few years ago above). Now, I say we’ll see the lunar eclipse, but of course you have to avoid having clouds in between you and the moon, and here in New England that is looking unlikely. But you never know…

If the skies cooperate, you can see the eclipse on the East Coast from about 10:30 pm until 1:45 am, with the eclipse being total from about 11:30 to 12:30. Unlike a solar eclipse, you can watch a lunar eclipse with your naked eyes.

You may have seen references to this being a Blood Moon, a Wolf Moon, and a supermoon…the Blood Moon refers to the eclipse (and the color the moon often turns, based on atmospheric conditions), the Wolf Moon is a very common name for the January full moon, and a supermoon means that the moon is a bit closer in its orbit and appears 5-10% larger in the sky than is average.

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Photography in Maine January 2019

Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I’m starting a new series of monthly posts that cover photography exhibits in the state of Maine. Let me know if you find it useful — I hope so, as I haven’t found a site yet that does this. For Boston and some of greater New England, I recommend the What Will You Remember blog for exhibit lists and reviews. If you have an exhibit you’d like me to publicize, please let me know as well. For January, this is what I’ve found so far…

Portland Museum of Art, Portland. The big photography show is Richard Avedon: Portraits, 1952-1970, which is a must-see (that I haven’t yet seen!). You and I both have until June 16th to see it. The Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago exhibit also includes photography and extends until May 5th.

Bates College Museum of Art, Lewiston. Peter Turnley: Refugees through March 23rd, 2019, photojournalism of refugees throughout world. Anthropocenic: Art About the Natural World in the Human Era, also through March 23rd, includes a variety of artwork (including work by a number of photographyers) focused on nature and the effect of mankind upon it in the 21st Century.

162 Russell, Rockport. I definitely recommend checking out the extended pop-up exhibition at 162 Russell Ave in Rockport (the old CMCA building. The exhibit takes advantage of the beautiful space with collected works from Paul Caponigro, Ni Rong, and Dirk McDonnell. The show extends until February 2nd and is open Fridays and Saturdays 1-5 pm. You can hear an interview with them about the show here.

Center for Maine Contemporary Art, Rockland. The 2018 Biennial is up through March 3rd, and includes work from photographers such as Sal Taylor Kidd and Rachel Sieben (among much other work!).

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My Favorite Photographs of 2018

In what has become an annual (and non-unique) tradition, I love to share my favorite photographs that I made during the previous year. Such a list is obviously subjective and likely to change based on mood (and the fact that I’m still going through my photographs from last year!), but I like to put a stake in the sand nonetheless.

In another annual tradition, I love to share favorite photographs taken by my readers, too. So, if you have a favorite photograph that you took last year, please consider sending it to me, and I’ll include it in a post with your name (and link, if you’d like) later this month.

Given that my first ever trip to Iceland was in 2018, the landscapes of that beautiful country play an outsized role in my list of favorites. This first photograph is from an amazing black sand beach near my artist residency at the Baer Art Center in Hofsós, Iceland. I spent many hours photographing the beach and waves there and I’m still digging through the results.

Skagafjörður Beach, Iceland, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

My Pyrotechnic series is complete, but I can’t myself from playing around with abstracted fireworks. In 2018 I came up with a new look and this is my favorite of the bunch. Soon I’ll have the full set up on my website.

Pyrotechnic Redux #1. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Going back to Iceland photographs, this photograph of Dettifoss waterfall is one of my favorites…especially when printed BIG. I have a 30″x30″ sitting here in my studio and want to try going even bigger.

Dettifoss, Iceland. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

The famous Jökulsárlón in Iceland (a/k/a Diamond Beach) has become such an overdone subject…and yet I couldn’t help myself once I came upon a combined glacier/lagoon/ocean/black sand beach.

Jökulsárlón, Iceland. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

After going to the reviews in Santa Fe, I finally was able to revisit Great Sand Dunes National Park in southern Colorado after twenty years away.

Great Sand Dunes National Park. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

While in Iceland, I became obsessed with Drangey, a magical (maybe literally!) island just off the coast where I was staying for my residency. I photographed it all week in all kinds of different weather and light. At the moment this is my favorite of that group.

Drangey, Iceland. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved

Another favorite location in Iceland was the Rauðfeldsgjá ravine. This photograph is looking up from inside the ravine…and is another photograph that really needs to be a large print.

Rauðfeldsgjá, Iceland. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

…and from just a few miles away on the volcanic mountain Snæfellsjökull, maybe my favorite photograph of the year:

Snæfellsjökull, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

And now for some glaciers. Seeing the glaciers of Iceland was at the top of my list, and I’ve restrained myself by only putting two of these resulting photographs on this list of twelve.

Fjallsjökull, Iceland, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
Svínafellsjökull, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

…and lastly, I’d like to share two photographs from my Terra Incognita project where I’ve started pushing the boundaries of traditional landscapes in different ways.

Terra Incognita #4, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
Terra Incognita project, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
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2019 Printing and Photography Workshops

“The Tarn”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I’m pleased to announce my three 2019 workshops, all provided through Maine Media Workshops. I’m teaching one session of A Sense of Wonder and two separate sessions of my printing course. I’ve included the course descriptions below, and please follow the links to find out more information and to register. Feel free to contact me with any questions as well.

A Sense of Wonder, June 23rd-June 29th, 2019, Maine Media Workshops

Find new avenues for creative expression as you explore the mysteries of the natural world. Through a combination of lectures, image and portfolio reviews, demonstrations, discussions, and photographing as a group in the field, you’ll learn how to better appreciate the wonder in the natural landscape all around you, and to learn tips and techniques necessary to capture it in your photographs.

Ranging from sea to mountain to lake and to forest, you’ll get to explore intimate details of the landscape and learn how to capture natural processes such as tides and winds. You’ll have the opportunity to photograph the night sky (even experimenting with hooking your camera to a telescope) to explore the cosmos and, on the other end of the spectrum, you’ll be able to capture smaller aspects of nature with macro lenses and a microscope.

Discovery and experimentation are at the heart of this workshop.  You’ll find joy in discovering the Maine landscape in new and creatively exciting ways.

Participants may work in any medium and in color or black & white.

The Craft and Art of the Fine Digital Print, April 8th-12th and September 8th-14th, 2019, Maine Media Workshops

In this course, students will learn a workflow for creating fine digital prints. The workflow includes digital capture, establishing an artistic intent, digital processing in Adobe Photoshop and/or Lightroom, printing on an inkjet printer, and handling the finished print. Digital processing and printing topics include maximizing image quality at capture, color management, sharpening and noise reduction, black & white printing, proofing, matching screen and print, and making local and global edits to color and tonality.

Throughout the course, we will work through images as a class by making a print, evaluating the print, making modifications, and ultimately producing a final print.

We also discuss the qualities and characteristics of a fine print, the many options for inks and papers available to today’s printers, and how best to produce a print to realize an artistic vision, including choosing the best paper for a particular project.

Students will also have ample opportunity to shoot in the field and to apply all of the techniques learned on their own images.

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