Summer Moon

"Summer Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I’ve been a bit remiss in finalizing my photographs from the summer for a variety of reasons. Being busy is certainly a big factor, but I’m also trying to gain my temporal separation between the taking of photographs and the evaluation of them. I have found that I can evaluate my own photographs more objectively with a bit of distance from the experience of creation.

In June we had our first trip Down East and camped up in Cobscook Bay State Park. It is a very beautiful area and we’ll definitely be returning. Conveniently we were camping at the time of the full moon, so I was able to capture the rising full moon from a new Maine location. I’ve named this full moon the Summer Moon, the name the Passamaquoddy used for the June full moon (that area of what is now Maine was originally Passamaquoddy land).

Please let me know what you think of this group, as always, and you can find my full moon series on my website, too!

"Summer Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon IV", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon V", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon V”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon VI", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon VI”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon VII", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon VII”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Summer Moon VIII", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon VIII”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

…and more new Pyrotechnic work

"Pyrotechnic #62", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #62”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I did promise some more of my new Pyrotechnic work from the July shows, so here are seven more new photographs from this body of work. I suppose this ends what has become an informal and unintentional Pyrotechnic week. Enjoy, and have a great holiday weekend!

"Pyrotechnic #61", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #61”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #72", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #72”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #51", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #51”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #76", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #76”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #57", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #57”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

"Pyrotechnic #52", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #52”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Pyrotechnic Work

"Pyrotechnic #46", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #46”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

The July fireworks shows were very productive for me and I absolutely love many of the new images for my Pyrotechnic series. Those of you who receive my e-mail newsletter may have already seen this first batch of six, but for those of you who haven’t here are the first six of the July 2013 keepers. (and if you’ve seen these, then stay tuned for another batch just around the corner in the next newsletter – sign up here if you so desire).

As always, please let me know what you think or if you have any favorites!

"Pyrotechnic #49", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #49”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #48", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #48”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

"Pyrotechnic #53", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #53”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #54", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #54”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Pyrotechnic #59", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Pyrotechnic #59”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

 

 

Hope Elephants and an exhibition at the Davis Orton Gallery

"Hope Elephants #8", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #8”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.

I recently was given the opportunity to photograph two of Midcoast Maine’s newest residents, Rosie and Opal. Rosie and Opal live at Hope Elephants, a wonderful new elephant rescue organization based in Hope, Maine (I definitely recommend going to their site to learn more and also to find out answers to questions such as whether Maine is too cold for elephants).

I’m very excited about the results from my initial shoot and look forward to visiting again and seeing where this project goes. Please let me know what you think, as always.

I’m even more excited to announce that this body of work was selected for the new “Animals: Real or Discovered” at the Davis Orton Gallery in Hudson, NY. The exhibition runs from June 28th (this Friday) until July 28th, with an opening reception this coming Saturday, June 29th, from 6-8 pm.  I unfortunately cannot make the opening reception for reasons that will be disclosed in the next post…but if any of you out there can make it to the gallery or the opening, please report!

"Hope Elephants #9", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #9”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #1", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #2", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #2”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #3", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #3”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #4", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #4”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #5", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #5”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
"Hope Elephants #6", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.
“Hope Elephants #6”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Hope Elephants.

Montpelier

"Montpelier #1", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.

A few months back, Tillman Crane contacted me about joining him and a group of photographers to photograph Montpelier (also known as the Knox Mansion) in Thomaston, Maine. I happily joined up with Tillman and his group and we all spent a great day photographing Montpelier.

The mansion is normally not open to photographers so this was a unique opportunity, as well as a chance to see how eight different sets of eyes would treat the same subject. The results of that day in the form or 3 or 4 pieces from each photographer are now displayed at Montpelier in a show entitled “A Day in the Life of Montpelier”. I really like how the work turned out and there is a nice diversity of aesthetics and processes on display.

The show extends through Labor Day and the gallery is open whenever the mansion is, which is typically Thursdays and Fridays throughout the summer as well as special occasions (see the site for details).

Montpelier is actually a reproduction of the original, long-ago razed mansion of Henry Knox, hero of the American Revolution and the first Secretary of War (and yes, Fort Knox in Tennessee and the less-famous one in Maine are both named after him).  The mansion has a fascinating combination of architectural designs and elements, many seen by Knox during his travels during the war to Europe. You can read more about the mansion and its architecture here.

I definitely recommend stopping by the mansion sometime to see its interesting architecture as well as the show. The photograph above and the next three below are all framed in the show on display, and I’ve also included a few other images from that day. Enjoy, and please let me know what you think!

"Montpelier #2", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #2”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #3", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #3”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #4", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #4”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #5", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #5”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #6", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #6”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #13", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #13”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #17", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #17”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #20", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #20”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #21", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #21”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Black Ice Portfolio & a Portfolio Walk in Boston

"Black Ice #1", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Black Ice #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Yesterday I posted about my new Boreas body of work in my Winter Atlas portfolio, and today I’d like to introduce my Black Ice portfolio. The image above leads off the group, and you can see the entire Black Ice portfolio at my website. As always, please let me know what you think!

Also, I’m heading down to Boston early (and I mean very early!) tomorrow morning to attend the New England Portfolio Reviews at BU. I’ll be there on both Friday and Saturday, and I’ll also have a table (or whatever they give you) at the Portfolio Walk on Saturday night. The Portfolio Walk is open to the public and basically gives you the chance to look through the portfolios of 50 of the photographers attending the reviews — I certainly encourage any Boston-area photographers out there to check it out. It should be a great time and I look forward to seeing all the work, as well as meeting whoever happens to stop by. The Portfolio Walk extends from 5-6:30 and you can find out more here.

New Work: Winter Atlas and Boreas portfolios

"Boreas #1", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Boreas #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I just launched on my website my new Winter Atlas portfolio — which is actually a group of portfolios, all based on snow and ice during winter here in Maine. I’m very excited about all of these portfolios, and I’ll start things off by introducing the Boreas portfolio.

After an early winter snowstorm, I hiked up Beech Hill in Rockport, Maine to photograph the moonrise. What I discovered on the hike was even more interesting — the high winds on top of that open hill had carved the snow into amazing formations. On that trip and subsequent ones, I photographed the snow formations, watching how they changed each time (and even during the hike if the winds were up).

c8a56d845c1eac0e611d5fd262195849The snow formed many different shapes, but none more fascinating to me than the one leading this post, which of course reminded me of this iconic work by Hokusai shown to the right.

 

You can find a few more photographs below and the entire portfolio on my website. I hope you enjoy the results, and please let me know what you think!

"Boreas #2", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Boreas #2”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Boreas #10", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Boreas #10”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Boreas #15", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Boreas #15”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Trapper’s Moon, upcoming full moon, and moon pillars

"Trapper's Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Trapper’s Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Before I talk about the Trapper’s Moon, I should mention this Saturday is May’s full moon, popularly called the Flower Moon. Friday night looks to be a better time to catch the moonrise here in Maine based on the relatively times of sunset and moonrise, but at this moment the weather is not looking great for either.  May’s full moon is one of the supermoons — a term that is more hype than science, but it will be appear just a little larger than average if you can indeed see it.

I photographed February’s full moon from near the Otter Cliffs in Acadia National Park and chose the name Trapper’s Moon from the Colonial American & Algonquin traditions for this year’s full moon. I was definitely pleased with this shoot — you can see the other two keepers below. You can find more photographs from my full moon project on my website, too.

One thing you’ll notice below is the presence of moon pillars. Moon pillars are optical phenomena that occur when the moon is low to the horizon, the air is cold, and properly-oriented ice crystals in the atmosphere direct light in a straight column directly above and below the moon (try here for a more scientifically detailed description). It may be hard to see much on these web-sized images rather than a larger print, but it was pretty spectacular in person — and a sight I’ve never seen before.

You never know what you’ll see when you get out in the world, whether you are photographing or not…

"Trapper's Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Trapper’s Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Trapper's Moon III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Trapper’s Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

Chaste Moon

"Chaste Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

March’s Full Moon is often called the Worm Moon in the United States as it is the time of year when earthworms often first appear, but I chose the name of Chaste Moon from medieval England for this series of photographs from Maine’s Birch Point State Park. The Chaste Moon gets its name from the observance of the return of the Maiden/Goddess and the approach of Spring, when farmers plant seeds in hope of a later ripening and harvest.

This was my first time to photograph from Birch Point and its Lucia Beach and the moonrise was spectacular. In some of my photographs I captured what I thought was some sort of bird (the small dot in the middle of the next photograph) as their were many sea birds flying about, but upon closer inspection it appears to me to be a beaver. They are known to cross saltwater, but I haven’t seen it before — any better guesses out there based on the close up image below?

"Chaste Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
Chaste Moon II close-up - possible beaver?
Chaste Moon II close-up – possible beaver?

Here is the moon first peeking up over the clouds (on the left)…

"Chaste Moon IV", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Here are two more of my keepers from this shoot. One of my favorite optical phenomenons is evidenced here in many of these – the blue band of the earth’s shadow below the purple sunset light. You can find more of my Adventures in Celestial Mechanics series here. As always, please let me know what you think!

"Chaste Moon V", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon V”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Chaste Moon VII", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon VII”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Fish Moon

"Fish Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Fish Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

April’s full moon goes by many names, as do all full moons, and I have chosen the Fish Moon for the name of photographs from last month. Coastal Native American tribes often called April’s full moon the Fish Moon in reference to the time of year when the shad swam upstream to spawn.

This year I photographed the rise of the full moon from Maine’s Popham Beach State Park. Because of low-lying fog and clouds over the sea, the moon was not immediately visible when it rose over the horizon, but it did rise above the obstructions before it became too bright to successfully photograph.

You can see many other photographs of the full moon as part of my Adventures in Celestial Mechanics series.

Below are two other full moon shots from the same shoot as well as two images of the lovely light on Popham Beach during the journey out to the shoot location. Enjoy, and please let me know what you think, as always!

"Fish Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Fish Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Fish Moon III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Fish Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Popham Beach, Sunset #4", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Popham Beach, Sunset #4”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Popham Beach, Sunset #5", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Popham Beach, Sunset #5”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.