June 2017 Full Moon

“Summer Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

It is that time again – June’s full moon is overnight tonight (technically the moment is tomorrow morning), so there will be good viewing (and photographing) of it tonight, tomorrow morning, and tomorrow evening. Moonrise tonight is at 7:22 pm (with sunset at 8:18 pm, all times for midcoast Maine), moonset tomorrow is 5:15 am, and moonrise tomorrow is 8:16 pm.

Looking back through my files, I was surprised to see I only had one really good June for photographing for my Adventures in the Celestial Mechanics series. I’ll share 4 photographs from June 2013 here in this post of the Summer Moon. Other popular names for the June full moon are the Rose Moon and Flower Moon, for reasons that are likely obvious if you are in North America.

Good viewing!

“Summer Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon IX”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Summer Moon VII”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

April 2017 Full Moon

“Egg Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I just wanted to quickly note that tonight is the full moon for April 2017. For Northern Hemisphere cultures, the April moon usually results in names related to spring, growth, or rebirth. I’ve used Egg Moon, Spring Moon, and Fish Moon (referring to shad moving upstream to spawn), and other common names are Pink Moon (referring to wild ground phlox), Growing Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon, and the like.

If you live here in Maine and would like to watch moonrise tonight, you can see it at 7:44 pm (after sunset at 7:15 pm), and moonset will be tomorrow morning at 6:28 am. And keep an eye out for Jupiter, too — last night it was very close to the moon!

“Egg Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Spring Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Spring Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

March 2017 Full Moon

“Moon When Eyes Are Sore From Bright Snow I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

The full moon for March 2017 is coming up tomorrow morning! You’ll have a good chance tonight with moonrise at 4:47 pm and sunset at 5:37 pm, as well as tomorrow morning’s moonset at 5:01 am. Tomorrow’s moonrise at 6:51 pm, just after sunset at 6:38 pm, might even be better (all times for midcoast Maine). (N.B. Note the times are much later because of the time change!).

March has been a great month for me in year’s past, and I’ve included some of my favorites here. The March full moon is of course known by many names across different cultures, and one of my favorite names is from the Dakota Sioux, who called it the Moon When Eyes Hurt from Bright Snow. Other popular names for this moon include the Algonquin names Full Worm Moon and Sugar Moon, as well as the English Chaste Moon and the Colonial American Lenten Moon.

“Chaste Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chaste Moon V”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Lenten Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Lenten Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of Wakening II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

February 2017 Full Snow Moon

“Hunger Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Well, this snuck up on me this month – today is the February’s full moon, commonly called the Snow Moon (which is very appropriate for weather right now in New England). I’ve not actually used that name for my past photographs of the February moon, going with Hunger Moon, Trapper’s Moon, Bone Moon, Storm Moon, and the Quiet Moon.

This month’s full moon comes with a penumbral eclipse, too — which basically means that the moon will appear a bit less bright than normal. This is not a full eclipse so you won’t see the Blood Moon kind of look, but you should be able to notice that the moon is dimmer than normal, particularly on the top/north side of the moon. The peak of the eclipse is 7:44 pm Eastern, and it starts and ends about 2 hours on both sides of that.

Here in midcoast Maine, moonrise will be at 4:50 pm with sunset at 4:59 pm.

Below I’ve included a few other February full moons from my full moon series.

“Bone Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Quiet Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Storm Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Trapper’s Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

January 2017 Full Moon

“Wolf Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

Tomorrow (January 12th) is the full moon and we may have a bit of a break in the weather here in Maine to actually see it. The moment of the full moon will occur tomorrow morning at 6:33 am (all times Eastern US). Tonight will actually be your best chance weather-wise here in Maine to view the full moon, with moonrise occurring at 3:50 pm and sunset following at 4:18 pm.

If you are lucky enough to be able to see past the atmosphere tomorrow, moonrise will be at 4:55 pm here in midcoast Maine (after sunset).

The most common name for January’s full moon is the Wolf Moon, named for the time of year when food and game were scarce and wolves roamed the snowy landscape. Other names that I’ve used for my full moon photographs in past years include the Quiet Moon, Moon of the Strong Cold, and the Great Spirit Moon. I’ve included a few past January moons here in this post, and you can see more of my Adventures in Celestial Mechanics project here.

“Quiet Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of the Strong Cold”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Great Spirit Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

 

December 2016 Full Moon

“Long Nights Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

December’s full moon is almost upon us, with the moment of the full moon coming at 7:05 pm on Tuesday, December 13th. It’s snowing right now but it should be clear tomorrow night for those hoping to view or photograph it. Moonrise tomorrow night will be at 4:11 pm and sunset at 3:57 pm (!) so it should be great viewing.

I’ve created some of my favorite photographs in my Adventures in Celestial Mechanics series documenting the full moon in December. Not surprisingly, North American names for the December full moon focused on the upcoming winter: Cold Moon, Long Nights Moon (one of my favorite all-time names), Winter Maker Moon, and Christmas Moon are all names I’ve used for different moons over the years.

This post includes some of my December full moons from years past, and you can see more of the series at my website. Good luck if you head out to watch the full moon this week!

“Cold Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Cold Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Christmas Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Winter Maker Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Winter Maker Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

November 2016 Full Moon

"Kindly Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Kindly Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

November’s full moon is coming up on Monday morning and it should be a great one. I’m a bit cautious in hyping the supermoons as they really aren’t much visibly larger than a “regular” full moon — usually they appear about 10% or 12% larger (this one more like 15% larger), and most people won’t even notice the difference. There is a great comparison photo at this link showing how little the apparent size actually varies.

A supermoon is basically a full moon that appears when the moon is closer than average in distance from the Earth. Since the moon orbits the Earth in an ellipse rather than a circle, there will be times when it is closer and and other times when it is further than average, making the moon appear larger or smaller, respectively. It is not a dramatic difference, but it is definitely a good excuse to get out there and enjoy watching moonrise or moonset of the supermoon.

The difference between this month and a typical supermoon is not humongous, but it is noteworthy, as it will appear larger than any full moon in the last 68 years (and bigger than any upcoming ones until 2034).

On Monday, moonset will be 6:15 am and moonrise will be at 4:45 pm (37 minutes after sunset). Moonrise Sunday night should be a good opportunity, too, with moonrise at 4:02 pm just before sunset.

The most common name for the November full moon is the Algonquin name, the Beaver Moon. Other names are the Frost or Frosty Moon and the Dark Moon. If you’d like to see my long-term full moon project, you can find it here. Good luck!

"Frost Moon III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Frost Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Frost Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Frost Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Beaver Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Beaver Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Dark Moon", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Dark Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

October 2016 Full Moon this weekend

"Hunter's Moon", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Hunter’s Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

I’m a bit late in posting this, so I’ll keep this short — October’s full moon is coming up this weekend. Technically the moment of the full moon is just after midnight Saturday night/Sunday morning, so there should be good viewing opportunities all weekend.

Saturday night moonrise here in Maine is at 5:56 pm, just after sunset at 5:51 pm, which is a great opportunity for the rising full moon and the landscape in the same photograph.

The October Full Moon is often called the Hunter’s Moon in years when the Harvest Moon is in September. Other names I love are The Moon of Falling Leaves, Moon of the Ripening, and the Wine Moon.

Enjoy!

"Wine Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Wine Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Moon of the Ripening I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of the Ripening I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Moon of Falling Leaves III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of Falling Leaves III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Moon of Falling Leaves I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of Falling Leaves I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Long Grass Moon", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Long Grass Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

September Full Moon (Harvest Moon)

"Harvest Moon". Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Harvest Moon”. Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

It is that time again with September’s full moon coming on Friday, September 16th. The time of the full moon is Friday afternoon at 3:05 pm (all times through midcoast Maine), so moonrise that day will likely be the best viewing opportunity. Moonrise on Friday will be at 6:51 pm, just after sunset at 6:43 pm.

The Harvest Moon is by far the most common name for this month’s full moon. Technically the Harvest Moon should be the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox…most of the time (including this year) that is the September full moon, but about 1/3 of the time it will be the October full moon.

The Harvest Moon is the most well-known moon name and it lives strongly in popular culture. Despite popular belief, it appears no larger than other moons, but it does rise close to the sunset multiple days in a row (compared to other times of year). Saturday’s moonrise, for example, is at 7:25 pm, just 34 minutes after Friday’s moonrise. This aspect of September’s moon is part of its origin story as a name, as farmers used the light from the rising full moon to extend their harvest day during this crucial time of year for the harvest.

September’s full moon has other names, of course, either from other cultures that don’t harvest this time of year and for years when it is not the moon closest to the equinox. Examples include the Moon of Plenty, the Chestnut Moon, Dancing Moon, Autumn Moon, and Rice Moon, all names I’ve used for my Adventures in Celestial Mechanics project.

In gathering photographs for this month’s post, I came to the realization that September has been my most productive month for my full moon photographs. I suppose it is partially luck and partially opportunity because of weather this time of year, but I was pleased to see the wide range of photographs from the last five years. Please enjoy some of the selections from this series in this post!

"Dancing Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Dancing Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Dancing Moon IV", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Dancing Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Autumn Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Autumn Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Autumn Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Autumn Moon III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Autumn Moon III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Blood Moon", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Blood Moon”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Chestnut Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Chestnut Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Harvest Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Harvest Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Moon of Plenty IV", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of Plenty IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Rice Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Rice Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Rice Moon II", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Rice Moon II”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

August 2016 Full Moon

"Dog Days Moon IV", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Dog Days Moon IV”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.

August’s full moon is just around the corner, with the moment of the full moon occurring at about 5:26 am on Thursday morning (all times midcoast Maine). Moonset at 5:52 am (with sunrise at 5:43 am) and Moonrise at 7:45 pm (after sunset at 7:35) should provide great photographic opportunities.

The August full moon goes by many names across different cultures. I love the Dog Days Moon and its reference with the sultry day of late summer, an association from ancient times based on the idea that the rising Sirius, the Dog Star, caused the hot weather.

The Algonquins also called the August full moon the Corn Moon or Green Corn moon for obvious harvest reasons (the English also called this the Corn Moon). I also love the Moon of the Ripening, a poetic Lakota name, that evokes ideas of crops ripening in the field.

I’ve included a few of my photographs from previous August full moons above and below — you can see more from my Adventure in Celestial Mechanics full moon project here.

"Corn Moon I", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Corn Moon I”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
"Moon of the Ripening III", Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.
“Moon of the Ripening III”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. All Rights Reserved.