Montpelier

"Montpelier #1", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #1”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.

A few months back, Tillman Crane contacted me about joining him and a group of photographers to photograph Montpelier (also known as the Knox Mansion) in Thomaston, Maine. I happily joined up with Tillman and his group and we all spent a great day photographing Montpelier.

The mansion is normally not open to photographers so this was a unique opportunity, as well as a chance to see how eight different sets of eyes would treat the same subject. The results of that day in the form or 3 or 4 pieces from each photographer are now displayed at Montpelier in a show entitled “A Day in the Life of Montpelier”. I really like how the work turned out and there is a nice diversity of aesthetics and processes on display.

The show extends through Labor Day and the gallery is open whenever the mansion is, which is typically Thursdays and Fridays throughout the summer as well as special occasions (see the site for details).

Montpelier is actually a reproduction of the original, long-ago razed mansion of Henry Knox, hero of the American Revolution and the first Secretary of War (and yes, Fort Knox in Tennessee and the less-famous one in Maine are both named after him).  The mansion has a fascinating combination of architectural designs and elements, many seen by Knox during his travels during the war to Europe. You can read more about the mansion and its architecture here.

I definitely recommend stopping by the mansion sometime to see its interesting architecture as well as the show. The photograph above and the next three below are all framed in the show on display, and I’ve also included a few other images from that day. Enjoy, and please let me know what you think!

"Montpelier #2", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #2”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #3", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #3”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #4", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #4”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #5", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #5”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #6", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #6”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #13", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #13”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #17", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #17”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #20", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #20”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
"Montpelier #21", Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.
“Montpelier #21”, Copyright Jim Nickelson. Courtesy Montpelier.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “Montpelier”

  1. I really liked #2. It wasn’t abstract, but you did a good job of flattening the depth in the image. #3 I liked as well — it looked like your work. 🙂 I’m also fond of #6. Thanks for sharing!

    1. Karen, thanks for the comments, and I have to agree that #3 is right in the wheelhouse of my other work…

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